Frc labview programming examples

The FRC game Deep Space has vision targets above many of the goals that you need to drive up to. These are very simple programs and only meant to show the concept of using limelight tracking data to control your robot. In each program, you can drive your robot with a gamepad.

Be careful to tune the various constants in the code for your particular robot. Some robots turn or drive more easily than others so tuning the proportional control constants must be done on a case-by-case basis. Also make sure the robot drives correctly using the gamepad controller before enabling the limelight seeking behavior.

You may need to invert some of your motor controllers. Here is a block diagram for a LabView VI which reads tracking data from a Limelight and generates drive and steer commands. Just save the image file to your computer and then drag it into a labview VI and the block diagram will be reproduced.

Send Raw Contours? What if the game calls for a different tracking algorithm? Why is there an extra usb port? How do I view the video stream? Are the eight LEDs bright enough? Does Limelight support protocols other than NetworkTables? Does Limelight support Active Gy6 valve cover breather hose My robot has extreme voltage swings while driving, will this damage my Limelight?

FRC LabVIEW Tutorials - Home

TimedRobot ; import edu. SendableChooser ; import edu. SmartDashboard ; import edu.Upcoming Events:. The proper version of the library code gets loaded depending on the current Target PC vs. An odd side effect of this is that if you drop a library vi onto a blank vi just to drill down to study the internals, then you will probably get the PC version and you'll be studying how the cRIO simulator works, not how the robot version of the code works.

The framework is just a basic program template and style that changes and improves a little bit each year. You can develop your own program using your own style completely from scratch. The essential elements every FRC robot program requires are: Communications with the Driver Station Recognizing and processing the different competition modes arriving in the DS packets Autonomous operations Teleop driver controls Team Code The Team Code folder contains all the code you should normally modify to fit your robot and game plan.

If you add vi's of your own they should also be kept here. Nothing outside should be touched until you hit the Advanced slopes.

This is called only once at the very start. The Framework is setup here in Begin. Autonomous Independent. It is set to be automatically called and adding your own calls will disrupt that background process and can cause your robot to be inoperable during teleop.

This is called only once, so put everything you want done during Autonomous Mode here. You don't leave this, so waits and delays can be used as desired here. This is called 50 times each second as the Driver Station control packets arrive. Do NOT write code in here that waits or takes more than a few milliseconds to execute. If this vi takes too long to execute, then your driver controls will respond sluggishly, sporadically, or not at all.

Normal driver operating code will usually be split between Teleop. Periodic Tasks. Compared to computer speed it takes a very long time to physically pull back a mechanism, latch it, and release it again. Anything that makes you want to add a time delay or have to wait for a sensor to tell you it's ready can more easily be done in Periodic Tasks. Typically, you'll have several completely separate loops running in here to do mutually independent stuff.

This can be used for timed sequences, for instance, if you have a mechanism that operates in several discrete steps. Oddly enough due to the way we shutdown, i. It's presence here is to teach good form that will be important in most normal applications of LabVIEW that students will encounter when using it at college and work. Because the framework spreads the required elements over several files these examples are in image form to get all the parts together where you can see everything in one glance.Upcoming Events:.

The proper version of the library code gets loaded depending on the current Target PC vs. An odd side effect of this is that if you drop a library vi onto a blank vi just to drill down to study the internals, then you will probably get the PC version and you'll be studying how the cRIO simulator works, not how the robot version of the code works.

Common Robot Operations Here are examples of ways to do some of the most common robot functions. Because the framework spreads the required elements over several files these examples are in image form to get all the parts together where you can see everything in one glance. Each example includes the menu paths to where all the icons used within that image are found.

LabVIEW also provides stand-alone ready-to-execute examples from the Getting Started Window that include wiring diagrams for connecting devices properly. Those sample projects are great for testing if a device is working and wired correctly.

Since they are stand-alone programs it takes some intermediate understanding of the default framework to figure out how to properly integrate the concepts into your LabVIEW project. Here is an example of how to minimize that potential problem. The motor is Disabled when neutral whenever it is not actively being commanded to move. Add a Select for each like so: Don't want to have to keep holding the button down? This acts based on which of an array of buttons was pushed.

Lowest number button wins if several are pushed at once. It's handled in an unusual way, because it is a degree button that sends the directional angle it is pressed in 45 degree increments. Has a counter mode that counts the number of times the switch is activated.

A good place for this is in Periodic Tasks in the ms loop. To use it in Periodic Tasks, for instance, it would be called inside a loop and a loop delay would be added. The first example has the same deadband, but truncates the motor output delivering between.

This is good for devices, such as drivetrains, that won't move with less than. It gives the joystick a little more range. In the second example the joystick is ignored within the deadband.

A possible variation might be to allow more power to the Arcade rotate input. One caution about Counter - it can produce scrambled or bogus values on startup, so be careful and examine the results when you first put it to use.

You tell it the number of values n to average only with the first call, thereafter, that input is ignored. It also lets you know when you have reached a full set of values. This example illustrates initialization, sequencing to avoid clobbering values as you use them, safeguarding from changing inputs that cannot be changed, array manipulation, and creating a cycling index.Click Tap to close.

This optimization is not for the robot, rather it is for the developer. For the duration of this tutorial, it is assumed that the motors and joysticks have already been opened in Begin. This configuration utilizes the producer-consumer architecture.

This allows the code for controlling the actuators to be in one single place periodic tasks and the code to control it to be in either Teleop or Autonomous - depending on which mode the robot is in. This setup has both a major advantage and disadvantage. The advantage is that the code for moving is reused, and does not need to be repeated in addition to the fact that if a control is changed in autonomous, the robot only needs to be re-enabled to use the updated variation.

In the block diagram, we enable the for loop that uses the array, and update the current movement indicator delete and recreate. This loop will perform each instruction for the specified amount of time, then move onto the next instruction in the array. Using an fgv to pass the shooter speed to periodic tasks, the autonomous. By using the array of movements and the fgv, no code is unnecessarily repeated assuming that the drive code used in teleop is slightly differentand by using the fgvdata checking can be performed that values that are input for the shooter speed are valid.

Google Form to request details. Sensors Dashboard Arduino Gyro. Archives Switching Cameras. Setup For the duration of this tutorial, it is assumed that the motors and joysticks have already been opened in Begin. Architecture This configuration utilizes the producer-consumer architecture. Caveat This setup has both a major advantage and disadvantage.

Periodic Tasks. Summary By using the array of movements and the fgv, no code is unnecessarily repeated assuming that the drive code used in teleop is slightly differentand by using the fgvdata checking can be performed that values that are input for the shooter speed are valid.

frc labview programming examples

Possible Improvements One could use encoders and a PID to make the movements instead of time One could change the loop so that it remains there until the motors are done moving if using previous improvement If this tutorial inadvertently leaves some details out, please tell us about it and we will update it. By using this site, you agree to have anonymized data collected on your use of the site.

For details or to opt out, click here Dismiss.Download and installation times will vary widely with computer and internet connection specifications, however note that this process involves a large file download and installation and will likely take at least an hour to complete.

While these versions should be able to co-exist on a single computer, this is not a configuration that has been extensively tested. The new version will likely co-exist with the old version, but all testing has been done with FRC only. In the dialog box that appears, select all entries. Click Remove. Wait for the uninstaller to complete and reboot if prompted.

These instructions assume that no other National Instruments software is installed. If you have other National Instruments software installed, it is necessary to uncheck the software that should not be uninstalled. If you wish to install on other machines offline, do not click the Download button, click Individual Offline Installers and then click Download, to download the full installer.

It is recommended to use a fast internet connection and to use the NI Downloader to allow the download to resume if interrupted. Teams are permitted to install the software on as many team computers as needed, subject to the restrictions and license terms that accompany the applicable software, and provided that only team members or mentors use the software, and solely for FRC.

Rights to use LabVIEW are governed solely by the terms of the license agreements that are shown during the installation of the applicable software. Run the downloaded exe file to start the install process. Right click on the downloaded iso file and select mount. Run install. Install 7-Zip download here. As of the writing of this document, the current released version is Right click on the downloaded iso file and select Extract to.

You will be prompted whether to enable the NI update service. You can choose to not enable the update service. Log into your ni. If this is the first time activating the software on this account, you will see the message shown above about a valid license not being found. You can ignore this. The items shown above are not expected to activate.

Getting Started With the Xbox One Controller

Warning These instructions assume that no other National Instruments software is installed. Offline Installer Windows There are a number of resouces available to teams to help with programing their robot controllers.

Some of them are listed below:. Programming There are a number of resouces available to teams to help with programing their robot controllers. The default Innovation First libraries are the basis for all the other code shown below. By getting this code you are free to completely set the structure of your program as you would like. This is also the most complex starting point, proably not for inexperienced programing teams.

This site is an excellent one-stop-shopping resource for sample code an datasheets for the IFI controllers. It was Kevin's initial work in figuring out the operation of the microprocessor and many of the sensors that made these controllers more approachable for eveyone.

All source code is provided for Kevin's projects. WPILib was developed as a reusable code library that greatly simplifies the programming model for the IFI controllers. It has "drivers" for all the devices in the FRC kit of parts with a very simple programming interface.

There is also complete documentation for all of WPILib in the form of a 60 page PDF file with lots of examples and explanations and tips. Intelitek easyC is the easiest way to get started programming IFI based robots. It is a drag and drop programming model where blocks are selected from a palette and dropped into your program.

As the blocks are added to the program, C code is written in another window that you can view. New in this version include direct C source file editing, graphical display tools, and better robot definition screens.

All the kit sensors are directly supported by easyC.

Perfect Autonomous - Intermediate FRC LabVIEW

This gives programmers on a team to get a head start writing software by developing a model of the robot in software that LabVIEW uses to simulate motors, drive trains, chassis, and senors.

By connecting the DAQ to the inputs and outputs on the robot controller, the software can run as if it were connected to actual hardware. Maintained by webmaster wpi.It would be wrong of me to say there is one right way of setting up your code. There is not. You can set up your code any way you would like, as long as you can understand the structure and effectively navigate your code. A common occurrence in robot code is a file called RobotMap.

This file contains constants use throughout the robot. Such constants include motor controller port numbers, button mapping for certain robot functions, and PID constants for your control loops. Many teams use RobotMap for keeping track of constants, but to me it makes sense for constants such as PID to be within their respective component classes, and just having the values in robotInit where you initialize all of your hardware.

OI goes hand in hand with RobotMapsince they both serve similar purposes. The main purpose is for all of your inputs such as joysticks to go into OI and the main robot program will call functions from OI. A simple setup will look like this syntax aside.

The use of an extra file for some more readability may be a worthwhile tradeoff.

frc labview programming examples

Talk with your team to decide if you want to use this form of structuring your code. Both ways are fine, but the most important thing is to be consistent. It is actually less helpful to only have some of the joystick inputs in OI than to have no OI file at all. The same goes for programming. The first step to having clean code is to have good organization. The following examples show IterativeRobot, however the same logic an be applied to Sample and Periodic.

This allows the other methods you will use such as teleopPeriodic or operatorControl to have access to your robot components. Inside robotInit is where we actually initializing the variables. Also notice how I never created variables for the drive motors.

frc labview programming examples

It makes more sense to declare them as variables inside the drive class, where you can customize them such as setting PID if they are CANTalons, or reversing them if need be.

If you are using RobotMap, this is where the values stored in RobotMap would be used. The main basis of teleop code is using if statements to check for input, and the performing some action based on these events.

For example. You probably want it to be at the top, that way if you have any code that edits the drive such as angle rotation code the values will not get overwritten by the joysticks. The components should be made up of setters, getters, and an execute method. The setters will be used to set variables used in the execute method. A good example is a function move in the drive class that sets the fwd and rot variables. These variables can then be used in the execute method to set motors.

In order for this structure to work, it is crucial that the only place motors, relays, etc. This prevents different parts of the robot overwriting each other.

Essentially, imagine you have two buttons on your joystick. One is to set a motor to full forward, the other, full reverse. If in your code you had.

Now you could you an else if loop, but it can be annoying to manage precedence like this. Using verb methods allows every button to affect the outcome, but only the last one to actually show on the robot. This is helpful if you create autonomous commands that interact like a human.

You can put them all the way at the bottom or top, and guarantee they either always take precedence, always yield, or a mix of the two. Unit tests are very important. Subsystems such as drive, shooter, intake, etc.